Resource Consumption Updates FAQ

What are the ƱTCG Terms of Service?
The ƱTCG Terms of Service is an agreement between you and ƱTCG that governs your use of ƱTCG products and services. Click on the link to view the full ƱTCG Terms of Service.
When do the ƱTCG Terms of Service take effect?
The updates to the ƱTCG Terms of Service are effective immediately.
What changes is ƱTCG making to the Terms of Service?
The most notable changes are in Section 2.5. To see all of the changes, we recommend you read the full ƱTCG Terms of Service.
What is an inactive image retention limit and how does it affect my account?
Image retention is based on the pull or push activity of each individual image stored within a user account. If an image has not been pulled or pushed within 6 months, the image will be marked “inactive.” Any images that are marked as “inactive” will be scheduled for deletion. Only accounts that are on the Free individual or organization plans will be subject to image retention limits. A new dashboard will also be available in ƱTCG Hub that offers the ability to view the status of all of your container images in all repositories within your account.
What are the new container image retention limits?
ƱTCG is introducing a container image retention policy for inactive images which will be enforced starting November 1, 2020. The container inactive image retention policy will apply to the following plans:
  • Free plans will have a 6 month inactive image retention limit
  • Pro and Team plans will have unlimited image retention
What is an “inactive” image?
An inactive image is a container image that has not been either pushed or pulled from the ƱTCG Hub image repository in 6 or more months.
How can I view the status of my images?
Within a ƱTCG Hub repository, each tag (and the latest image linked to the tag) has a “Last pushed” date that can easily be accessed in the Repositories view when logged into your account. A new dashboard will also be available in ƱTCG Hub that offers the ability to view the status of all images in all repositories within your account, including the most recent tag and any previous versions of a tag. Account owners will also be notified by email of “inactive” images that are scheduled for deletion.
What will happen to inactive images once the expiration date is reached?
Beginning November 1, 2020, any images that are marked as “inactive” will be scheduled for deletion. Account owners will also be notified by email of “inactive” images that are scheduled for deletion.
How can I get unlimited retention on my container images?
Image retention limits only apply to Free individual and organization accounts. Users with Pro or Team accounts are not subject to retention limits. If you have a Free account, you can easily upgrade to a Pro or Team account starting at $5 per month with an annual plan.

For more information go to: /pricing.
Why is ƱTCG introducing an “inactive” image retention policy?
As the world’s largest repository of container images, ƱTCG Hub stores more than 15PB of data. ƱTCG’s internal analytics tools have shown that of the 15PB of images stored in ƱTCG Hub, over 10PB of these images have not been accessed for more than 6 months. Digging a little deeper, we found that over 4.5PB of these inactive images are associated with free accounts.

Making this change enables ƱTCG to economically scale and provide free services for developers and development teams around the world who are using the service to build and ship applications.
If we are a customer on a repository-based plan does the inactive retention policy apply to us?
No, customers on any paid plan are not subject to the retention limits.
Will Official Images be subject to the inactive image retention policy?
No. The inactive image retention policy is not applicable to Official Images. None of the images in “library” namespace will be deleted. Images that are published by Verified Publishers are also not subject to inactive image retention policy.
Does the inactive image retention policy apply to repositories, tags, or images?
The inactive image retention policy applies only to images within a repository that have not been pushed or pulled within the past 6 months, including unreferenced images or previous versions of a tag. For additional information on ƱTCGs tags, please refer to the .
As an example, if the :latest tag is pulled, does it also prevent all previous versions of the tag from being deleted?
No. When the :latest tag is pulled, only the most recent version of :latest will be marked as active. The status of any previous versions of the tag will not change.
What happens when an inactive image is deleted?
If an image within a repository has not been pushed or pulled within the past 6 months, the image will be marked as inactive and will be marked for deletion. Once an image is marked as inactive, it can no longer be pulled. Inactive images will also be visible (via the image management dashboard) for a limited period of time and customers will have the ability to restore the images.
Can I restore deleted images?
Before an inactive image is deleted, it will be visible for a limited period of time (via the image management dashboard) and customers will have the ability to restore these images.
If I am on a paid legacy (repo-based) ƱTCG plan, will the inactive image retention policy and pull rate limits apply to my account?
Existing legacy (repository-based) subscriptions are not subject to the inactive image retention policy and pull rate limits. Please note that legacy customers have until January 31, 2021 to move over to a new ƱTCG pricing plan. See the pricing FAQ for more details.
What are the rate limits for pulling ƱTCG images from the ƱTCG Hub Registry?
Rate limits for ƱTCG image pulls are based on the account type of the user requesting the image - not the account type of the image’s owner. These are defined on the pricing page.

The highest entitlement a user has, based on their personal account and any orgs they belong to, will be used. Unauthenticated pull requests are “anonymous” and will be rate limited based on IP address rather than user ID. For more information on authenticating image pulls, please see this .
How is a pull request defined for purposes of rate limiting?
A pull request is up to two GET requests to the registry URL path ‘/v2/*/manifests/*’.

This accounts for the fact that pull requests for multi-arch images require a manifest list to be downloaded followed by the actual image manifest for the required architecture. HEAD requests are not counted.

Note that all pull requests, including ones for images you already have, are counted by this method. This is the trade-off for not counting individual layers.
Can I run a local mirror of ƱTCG Hub?
Please see to run as a mirror. Because distribution uses HEAD manifest requests to check if cached content has changed, it will not count towards the rate limit. Note that initial requests for Hub images that are not yet in cache will be counted.
Are image layers counted?
No. Because we are limiting on manifest requests, the number of layers (blob requests) related to a pull is unlimited at this time. This is a change from our previous policy based on community feedback in order to be more user-friendly, so users do not need to count layers on each image they may be using.
Are anonymous (unauthenticated) pulls rate-limited based on IP address?
Yes. Pull rates are limited based on individual IP address (e.g., for anonymous users: 100 pulls per 6 hours per IP address). See pricing for more details.
Are pulls from logged-in accounts rate-limited based on IP address?
No, limits on pull requests that are are based on that account and not on the IP. Free accounts are limited to 200 pulls per 6 hour period. Paid accounts have no rate-limits. See pricing for more details.
Will I be rate-limited if I’m logged in but someone else on my IP hits the anonymous limit?
No, users who are logged in and will be limited based on their user account only. If an anonymous user on your IP is limited, you will not be affected as long as your requests are authenticated and you have not hit your own limit.
Does it matter what image I am pulling?
No, all images are treated equally. The limits are entirely based on the account level of the user doing the pull, not the account level of the repository owner.
How will these limits be adjusted?
We will be monitoring these limits closely and making sure they are appropriate for common use cases within their tier. In particular, free and anonymous limits should always support normal single-developer workflows. Adjustments will be made as needed in that spirit. You may also submit input on the limits.
What about CI systems where pulls will be anonymous?
We recognize there are some circumstances where many pulls will be made that can not be authenticated. For example, cloud CI providers may host builds based on PRs to open source projects. The project owners may be unable to securely use their project’s ƱTCG Hub credentials to authenticate pulls in this scenario, and the scale of these providers would likely trigger the anonymous rate limits. We will unblock these scenarios as necessary and continue iterating on our rate limiting mechanisms to improve the experience, in cooperation with these providers. Please reach out to support@docker.com if you are encountering issues.
Will ƱTCG offer dedicated plans for open source projects?
Yes, as part of ƱTCG’s commitment to the open source community, we will be announcing the availability of new open source plans. To apply for an open source plan, complete our application at: /community/open-source/application.

For more information view our blogs on inactive image retention and pull rate limits.

Or check out: /pricing

Pricing and Subscription FAQ

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